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About the Events

2016 Rulebook (PDF)
2016 Rulebook (Word)

 

WELCOME CONTESTANTS & RODEO FANS

The American Family Rodeo Association was formed to keep the Family involved in America's original sport, Rodeo. This is where responsibility, sportsmanship, respect, skill and most importantly friendships are made. AFRA offers events for all ages, from our 6 & Under Mutton Busters to the seven original adult rodeo events. Our unique organization keeps the family competing together and staying together.

 

AFRA RODEO EVENTS

MUTTON BUSTING

This event is designed to groom the contestant to become a rough stock rider. The contestant must be 6 years old or younger and has to ride the sheep for a full five seconds. They may ride with one or both hands. A higher score will be awarded to contestants riding with one hand.

 

CALF RIDING

Contestants age 7 to 9 may compete in this event. The contestant puts a bull rope around the calf, just behind the shoulders. The contestant then runs their hand through the hand hold and wraps the tail of the rope around the hand. Time starts when the chute gate opens. A calf rider must stay on for five seconds and is disqualified if they touch their body or the calf's with their free hand.

 

PEEWEE BULL RIDING

Contestants age 10 to 14 may compete in this event. The contestants put a bull rope around the calf, just behind the shoulders. The contestant then runs their hand through the hand hold and wraps the tail of the rope around the hand. Time starts when the chute gate opens. A peewee bull rider must stay on for six seconds and is disqualified if they touch their body or the calf's with their free hand.

CHUTE DOGGING

In the chute dogging event, the contestant or "dogger" attempts to wrestle a steer, which averages a weight approximately three times that of the contestant. The dogger gets beside the steer in the chute, places his left hand on the steer's horns and his right hand behind the steer's shoulder. When the dogger is ready, the chute gate opens. The dogger must let the steer's nose cross the white chalk line before attempting to wrestle the steer. The judge stops the time when the steer is on its side with all four feet pointing in the same direction.

CALF ROPING

Calf roping can be traced back to the Old West when a working cowboy would use it as a method of catching a calf for branding or to doctor. Today, it's one of the fastest and most exciting events in rodeo. The calf gets a designated head start into the arena and must trip the barrier string before the horse and rider can begin to chase ( the cowboy will be assessed a 10-second penalty for breaking the barrier). In this event, it is catch as catch can. After roping the calf, the cowboy must dismount and run to the calf and "daylight" the calf. After this is done, the cowboy then must gather and tie any three legs of the calf. The cowboy will throw his hands in the air to signify the end of his run. The calf has to stay tied for five seconds or the cowboy receives a no-time.

BREAKAWAY ROPING

Breakaway roping is similar to calf roping. Like calf roping, the calf gets a designated head start into the arena and must trip the barrier string before the horse and rider can begin to chase (the contestant will be assessed a 10-second penalty for breaking the barrier). The thrown loop must pass over the calf's head. The rope, which is tied to the saddle horn with a light-weight nylon string, will break free from the saddle when the slack is pulled tight. There is a white handkerchief tied to the end of the rope. The judge will signal for time to stop when the handkerchief flies from the saddle horn.

TEAM ROPING

Team roping is just that - a team effort. A steer is given a designated head start into the arena and must trip the barrier string before the horse and rider can begin to chase ( the run will be assessed a 10-second penalty for breaking the barrier). The "header" has to rope the horns of the steer and turn it so the "heeler" can rope the back two feet. Once the header and heeler have roped both ends of the steer, stretched it and are "facing" each other, the judge signals for time to stop. A five second penalty will be assessed to the run if only one foot of the steer is caught.

BAREBACK

A bareback bronc rider places himself in the middle of a twisting, bucking whirlwind with intent to weather the eight second storm. The rider attempts this feat with a rigging that resembles a suitcase handle. He places the rigging around the horse, just behind the shoulders. The judges watch for the bucking pattern, the strength of the horse, the strength of the rider, and the rider's spurring action and control. The rider gets a no-time if bucked off before the full eight seconds and is disqualified if he touches his body or the horse with his free hand.

 

JUNIOR BULL RIDING

Contestants age 15-19 may compete in this event. The contestants put a bull rope around the bull, just behind the shoulders. The contestant then runs their hand through the hand hold and wraps the tail of the rope around the hand. Time starts when the chute gate opens. A bull rider must stay on for eight seconds and is disqualified if they touch their body or the bull's with their free hand.

SADDLE BRONC RIDING

Rodeo's classic event - saddle bronc riding - is an exercise in style and finesse that demands near perfect timing. To earn a score, a rider must remain aboard a pitching bronc for eight seconds. To earn a high score, he must ride with the grace and fluidity of a dancer. The cowboy uses a saddle with stirrups and a six-foot braided rein which he holds in one hand only. Saddle bronc riders are disqualified if they touch themselves, the horse or their equipment with their free hand.

GOAT TYING

The goat is staked out at one end of the arena. The contestant rides on their horse to the goat, dismounts, flanks the goat and ties three legs. The goat must remain tied for five seconds, or the contestant receives a no-time.

 

BARREL RACING

Barrel racing is a combination of a horse's speed and agility along with a rider's balance and control. Horse and rider race around the barrels in a cloverleaf pattern, starting and finishing at the same line. The rider can choose whether to start with left or right barrel. If the barrel racer tips a barrel over during their run, they are assessed a five second penalty and if they break the cloverleaf pattern, they will be disqualified. Times are recorded by an "electric eye" down to the one-thousandth of a second, winning times are usually less than one-tenth a second apart.

POLE BENDING


This is an event in which both the horse and rider show their skill and control. The contestant runs beside the poles, crossing the time line at the end pole. The rider turns the end pole and begins weaving in and out until they reach the other end. The rider rounds the end pole and weaves in and out until they reach the opposite end. After rounding the end pole the horse and rider head back across the time line to stop the clock. This event is also timed by an "electric eye." The rider is assessed a five second penalty for each pole knocked down. Balance and excellent horsemanship are a must to be competitive in this event.

BULL RIDING

Bull riding is not only the most dangerous event in rodeo but by far the most popular!! The rider puts a bull rope around the bull. He then puts his gloved hand through the hand hold and wraps the tail of the bull rope around that hand. This secures the rider to the bull. The bull rider is constantly gripping and grabbing new holds with his feet and pulling on the bull rope. The bull rider also uses his free hand to help remain balanced. The harder the bull is to ride, the better the score. The rider must stay on for eight seconds and is disqualified if he bucks off before then or if he touches his body or the bull's with his free hand.

RIBBON ROPING

Ribbon roping is similar to Breakaway roping, the calf gets a designated head start into the arena and must trip the barrier string before the horse and rider can begin to chase. ( the contestant will be assessed a 10-second penalty for breaking the barrier). The thrown loop must pass over the calf's head. The rope is tied to the saddle and unlike breakaway will not break free. The "header" must then jump off their horse and hold the calf while the partner removes the ribbon from the calf's tail and runs back across the finish line. "An Electric Eye " records the time.

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PHOTOS PROVIDED BY
D.W. RODEO PHOTOGRAPHY OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE AFRA